Ancient foot massage technique may ease cancer symptoms

ClinicalNews.Org

19 NOV 2012

EAST LANSING, Mich. — A study led by a Michigan State University researcher offers the strongest evidence yet that reflexology – a type of specialized foot massage practiced since the age of pharaohs – can help cancer patients manage their symptoms and perform daily tasks.

Funded by the National Cancer Institute and published in the latest issue of Oncology Nursing Forum, it is the first large-scale, randomized study of reflexology as a complement to standard cancer treatment, according to lead author Gwen Wyatt, a professor in the College of Nursing.

“It’s always been assumed that it’s a nice comfort measure, but to this point we really have not, in a rigorous way, documented the benefits,” Wyatt said. “This is the first step toward moving a complementary therapy from fringe care to mainstream care.”

Reflexology is based on the idea that stimulating specific points on the feet can…

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Eating cherries lowers risk of gout attacks by 35 percent

ClinicalNews.Org

05 OCT 2012
A new study found that patients with gout who consumed cherries over a two-day period showed a 35% lower risk of gout attacks compared to those who did not eat the fruit. Findings from this case-crossover study published in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), also suggest that risk of gout flares was 75% lower when cherry intake was combined with the uric-acid reducing drug, allopurinol, than in periods without exposure to cherries or treatment.

Previous research reports that 8.3 million adults in the U.S. suffer with gout, an inflammatory arthritis triggered by a crystallization of uric acid within the joints that causes excruciating pain and swelling. While there are many treatment options available, gout patients continue to be burdened by recurrent gout attacks, prompting patients and investigators to seek other preventive options such as cherries. Prior studies suggest that cherry…

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Study: An Apple a Day Lowers Level of Blood Chemical Linked to Hardening of the Arteries

ClinicalNews.Org

05 OCT 2012

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Eating an apple a day might in fact help keep the cardiologist away, new research suggests.

In a study of healthy, middle-aged adults, consumption of one apple a day for four weeks lowered by 40 percent blood levels of a substance linked to hardening of the arteries.

Taking capsules containing polyphenols, a type of antioxidant found in apples, had a similar, but not as large, effect.

The study, funded by an apple industry group, found that the apples lowered blood levels of oxidized LDL — low-density lipoprotein, the “bad” cholesterol. When LDL cholesterol interacts with free radicals to become oxidized, the cholesterol is more likely to promote inflammation and can cause tissue damage.

“When LDL becomes oxidized, it takes on a form that begins atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries,” said lead researcher Robert DiSilvestro, professor of human nutrition at Ohio State University and…

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Resveratrol found in grapes uncorks new targets for acne treatment

ClinicalNews.Org

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

30-Sep-2014

Antioxidant found in grapes uncorks new targets for acne treatment

UCLA study points to resveratrol as key to possible combination therapy

Got grapes? UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne.

The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug’s ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments.

Published in the current online edition of the journal Dermatology and Therapy, the early lab findings demonstrated that resveratrol and benzoyl peroxide attack the acne bacteria, called Propionibacterium acnes, in different ways.

Resveratrol is the same substance that has prompted some doctors to recommend that adults drink red wine for its heart-health properties. The antioxidant stops the formation of free radicals, which cause cell and tissue damage. Benzoyl peroxide…

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Organic Process Research and Development – India, The 32nd International Conference and Exhibition, NCL, Pune, India, 4-5 Dec 2014

New Drug Approvals

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TITLE . Organic Process Research & Development – India

Subtitle:The 32nd International Conference and Exhibition

When:04.12.2014 – 05.12.2014

Where:National Chemical LaboratoryPune, India

Brochure:View Brochure

Register..http://scientificupdate.co.uk/conferences/conferences-and-workshops.html

Organic Process Research & Development - India

for

  • Process Research & Development Chemists
  • Chemical Engineers in Industry
  • Heads of Departments & Team Leaders

Benefits

  • Invest in yourself: keeping up to date on current developments and future trends could mean greater job security.
  • Learn from a wide range of industrial case studies given by hand-picked industrial speakers.
  • Take home relevant ideas and information that are directly applicable to your own work with the full proceedings and a CD of the talks.
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Antibiotic residues in sausage meat may promote pathogen survival

ClinicalNews.Org

07 SEP 2012
Antibiotic residues in uncured pepperoni or salami meat are potent enough to weaken helpful bacteria that processors add to acidify the sausage to make it safe for consumption, according to a study to be published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, on August 28.

Sausage manufacturers commonly inoculate sausage meat with lactic-acid-producing bacteria in an effort to control the fermentation process so that the final product is acidic enough to kill pathogens that might have existed in the raw meat. By killing the bacteria that produce lactic acid, antibiotic residues can allow pathogenic bacteria to proliferate.

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and University College Cork, Ireland, found that antibiotic concentrations within limits set by US and European Union (EU) regulators are high enough to slow fermentation, the process that acidifies the sausages and helps destroy foodborne pathogens like Salmonella…

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