Eating cranberries can make you live longer, study suggests

Atasteofcreole's Blog

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/eat-cranberries-live-longer-study-article-1.1559412

Fruit flies fed sugar and cranberry extract in a recent study lived 25% longer than those fed only sugar. Scientists haven’t studied the effects on humans, but the same could be true. They say it’s the fruit’s antioxidant properties that prolong life.

A new study finds that cranberries have antioxidant properties that may prolong your life.

In new research to be published in the February 2014 issue of Experimental Gerontology, scientists have found that eating cranberries can extend your life significantly. The caveat: the study was conducted on fruit flies, not humans. A team from National Institute on Aging in Baltimore fed the flies sugar supplemented by two percent cranberry extract during three biological stages of their lives, which correspond in humans with young adulthood, middle age, and old age, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Findings showed that younger flies fed cranberry extract lived 25 percent longer than the…

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Drugs of the Season: Cranberries Go Beyond the Sauce

AAPS Blog

Andrew PorterfieldAndrew Porterfield has a master’s degree in biotechnology management from the University of Maryland and has worked as a marketing communications consultant for many biotechnology and pharmaceutical firms.

While most arguments about cranberries this holiday season revolve around “berries” or “jelly,” another debate is taking place among drug-makers and researchers: what medicinal value does this little dark red, sour fruit offer?

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Vitamin B7- Biotin

Medical Revolt

Yet one more B vitamin (and more to come) Vitamin B7 also known as Vitamin H or Biotin is also important in metabolism and the production of fatty acids and cell growth. It assists in the transfer of carbon dioxide in the body and aids in maintaining normal blood sugar. It also assists in normal adrenal function and for maintaining a healthy nervous system and metabolism

Most of our biotin actually does not come directly from food but from the bacteria in our intestines. It is found in many foods but only in small amounts. Foods that are rich in biotin include green leafy vegetables such as swiss chard and organ meats such as liver. The recommended daily allowance is 30 mcg/day.

Low biotin levels have been found in some populations most notably alcoholics, people who have had part of their stomach removed, the elderly and those with low stomach acid. Consumption…

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Greener, cheaper, safer drugs and perfume using iron

photo of perfume bottles on a tray

Researchers say iron can replace the rare and sometimes toxic compounds used to create perfumes and drugs (photo by Jenn Durfey via Flickr)

University of Toronto researchers have developed safer, cheaper and more environmentally-friendly techniques to produce compounds commonly used in drugs and perfumes.

Researchers used the  new techniques to create active, iron-based catalysts. These catalysts are needed to produce certain compounds used in the drug and perfume industries.  read all here

US HERBS –DAMIANA, reported to be an aphrodisiac, stimulant, mood elevator

New Drug Approvals

Damiana

Damiana (Turnera diffusa) is reported to be an aphrodisiac, stimulant, mood elevator, and “tonic,” and has been in use in the United States since 1874. Despite a paucity of research, it has reported testosterogenic activity, which may account for its traditional use by the Mayan people of Central America for enhancing sexual function in men and women.

Turnera diffusa, known as damiana, is a shrub native to southwestern Texas in the United States,[3] Central AmericaMexicoSouth America, and the Caribbean. It belongs to the family Passifloraceae.[2]

Damiana is a relatively small shrub that produces small, aromatic flowers. It blossoms in early to late summer and is followed by fruits that taste similar to figs. The shrub is said to have a strong spice-like odor somewhat like chamomile, due to the essential oils present in the plant.

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